Removing weeds from your lawn

Removing weeds from your lawn

The main step with weed control is to remove them from your lawn before they set seed.

Hand removal should be the first option for weed removal. If you regularly check your lawn and remove and dispose of the weeds then small outbreaks can be kept under control.

However, if you need to use a herbicide (weed killer) for it to work more effectively the lawn needs to be growing vigorously and in good health.

If you have not fed the lawn in the past six to eight weeks fertilise prior to applying your weed killer. 

Fertiliser strengthens lawns by opening the leaf’s pores allowing for better absorption of the herbicides.

You must wait at least 2-3 weeks after fertilising before applying the appropriate weed killer at the recommended dosages. 

Effective weed removal

Weeds are a nuisance, but they are just like plants and like to grow thick and rampant.

The best way to be rid of weeds is to create a lawn environment that is difficult for them to thrive within.

What attracts weeds in your lawn is low-mowed grass, compacted soil and water-deprived turf.

Fix these problems by maintaining a healthy lawn and you can say goodbye to weeds.

If removing weeds by hand be sure to remove the roots as well.

Can I kill weeds without killing grass?

Pre-emergent and post-emergent herbicides (weed killers) are designed to kill weeds but not the lawn. Both are made exclusively for weeds.

Post-emergent herbicides attack weeds after they have shown their ugly little heads. The ‘post’ part of this type of herbicide refers to the fact that it is used on already existing weeds and applied usually during spring and other times of the year when required.

Pre-emergent herbicides are used before you see signs of weeds usually during autumn or winter.

These herbicides will not affect your lawn if they are applied correctly, and you follow the directions.

Herbicides are available on their own or mixed in with a fertiliser. myhomeTURF recommends referring to LawnPride for more advice or vising your local garden centre.

Can I naturally remove weeds from my lawn?

Natural weed removal can be done but it does take time.

Spraying vinegar directly onto the weeds is a natural way to kill them. This method dries out the weed’s leaves and kills what’s above the ground.

Be sure to use vinegar that contains more than the standard 5% Acetic Acid. In order to buy a vinegar with 10% to 20% Acetic Acid, it is best to visit your local garden centre rather than the supermarket.

According to United States Department of Agriculture research, using this natural spray enables you to kill 80% to 100% percent of weeds’ top growth.

This natural weed control method works best for a few weeds spread throughout the lawn. You are advised to go for a safe, effective organic herbicide if you have a large spread of weeds on your lawn.  These can be available from your local garden centre or LawnPride.

Easy steps to fix a lawn full of weeds

If your lawn is becoming dominated by weeds here are some easy steps to help keep them under control:

  • Find out which weeds are most dominant on your lawn as treatments are made to target specific weeds. This enables you to purchase a specific product that kills those weeds.
  • Ascertain what sort of stage the weed is in (before or after seed set) and choose an appropriate treatment for that stage.
  • If it is springtime and you plan to kill the weeds before the growing season begins then your will require a pre-emergent herbicide. For established weeds buy a post-emergent herbicide.
  • In order to kill the weeds effectively follow the directions for both how much product to apply and when to use.
  • Ensure you maintain a proper lawn maintenance schedule to ensure you keep your lawn weed-free.
  • During autumn or spring consider aerating your lawn if necessary.
  • Prior to winter give your lawn one last short mow and fertiliser treatment – this will help your lawn stay strong through the winter months minimising the chance of weeds.
  • During spring, start fresh with pre-emergent herbicides and be quick to hand pick any lingering weeds.
  • During spring and summer, regularly mow your lawn and be careful not to remove more than a third of the grass at a time.
  • If you discover you have weeds in your lawn that have gone to seed when you mow ensure you have a catcher so they can be properly disposed of.

What to know more about lawn weeds? Click here – A guide to 10 of the most common lawn weeds

 

 

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